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Why Its Never Too Late To Change You Life And Live Differently

 

Why Its Never Too Late To Change You Life And Live Differently

 

“Everyday we live our life in constant motion, and with that motion, there will always be a flow or some kind of change that follows. Some changes we welcome open heartedly,…

Changing your life can be both scary and exciting, but more than anything it’s necessary to grow. Most people come to a point one day where they have to make a change in their life to either grow personally or professionally, but it’s hard to figure out when you’re ready to make that change.

So how do you know when it’s time that you’re ready to change your life?

The truth is there is at least one sign in front of you that you have been ignoring or not even noticing. This article will take you through 7 signs that shows you that you’re ready to take that next step.”

 

Your motivation has gone

 

“Humans all have something that makes them tick. A goal that makes them wake up at 5am even though they would love to sleep in late. A drive that makes them decline social events, because their jobs need them to stay all night, or maybe it’s the opposite and you attend social events to please the ones close to you.

It comes from your motivation to succeed either professionally or personally, but once the drive is missing, then you can’t keep going and you will lose your motivation.

If you suddenly can’t find that drive inside you once had, then it can be a sign. It can be your needs or wants that have changed. The important thing is that if you don’t feel the same motivation any longer, then it’s time to do something about it.

We’ve been taught to keep going even when it gets tough, but it’s okay to change and redefine yourself. It’s not about giving up. It’s about stopping up and revaluate whether you still want the same things in life.

Sometimes you may find out you still want the same time, but the way you’re going about it isn’t working for you.

Chris Sacca, an American venture investor, and entrepreneur, bought a cabin in Tahoe’s less-expensive neighbour and moved to the prime skiing and hiking country when he felt his motivation sliding away. He still had the same goals, but described a need for a change in his life to get back the right mind-set:

”I wanted to have the time to focus, to learn the things I wanted to learn, to build what I wanted to build, and to really invest in relationships that I wanted to grow, rather than just doing a day of coffee after coffee after coffee.”

If you still want the same things, then do what Chris Sacca did and change your daily routine. If you want new things, then maybe it’s time to quit your job, or make a change in your personal life.

It doesn’t mean that you have failed. It simply means you are ready to focus on what matters: You.

Find your passion and motivation back to live a better life with these tips:

 

Want to Know What Truly Motivates You, and How to Always Stay Motivated?”

“Walt has an ordinary life. He works in a job below his pay scale and ability, has a social life that stinks, and spends most weekends at work or in the shopping mall. It’s a safe, steady life but one full of monotony and boredom.

When Walt finds out he’s dying, he jumps into action to change the course of his life and focus on what really needs to be done. Sure, he makes a bad decision there, but the point is that he re-evaluates his life and figures out what his priorities are once he gets the bad news.

Mark Manson touches upon the power of knowing your time is up in ‘7 Strange Questions That Help You Find Your Life Purpose’. He believes death is a great motivator for thinking about what’s important. And it’s not hard to agree.

There’s no ultimatum. No deadline. No pressure. So we plod through life accepting the status quo even though, silently, we’re craving for more.

Or we’d add greater meaning to our lives in other, less extreme, ways. Perhaps we’d say “no” not as much, be kinder to ourselves and to others, embrace what we love in life, and focus on the people and things that matter most.

So we need to start living life on our terms and identify what’s important versus what doesn’t actually matter. Consider that our time on this planet is finite and start to live our lives with the kind of haste that normally follows bad news.

To learn more about living a less ordinary way of life, visit In Search of a Life Less Ordinary. Become a subscriber here.”

Ordinary life
“Walt has an ordinary life. He works in a job below his pay scale and ability, has a social life that stinks, and spends most weekends at work or in the shopping mall. It’s a safe, steady life but one full of monotony and boredom.”

Breaking bad
“The other day, I started watching Breaking Bad. I realize I’m one of the last people on earth to see the ratings giant but I found one character fascinating.”

Walt
“Walt has an ordinary life. He works in a job below his pay scale and ability, has a social life that stinks, and spends most weekends at work or in the shopping mall. It’s a safe, steady life but one full of monotony and boredom.

When Walt finds out he’s dying, he jumps into action to change the course of his life and focus on what really needs to be done. Sure, he makes a bad decision there, but the point is that he re-evaluates his life and figures out what his priorities are once he gets the bad news.

But what if, like Walt, we had a limited time left on this earth. Would we re-evaluate the things of importance to us? If we knew this was it, that our days were numbered, would we take back the control and fight for more?”

Mark manson
“Mark Manson touches upon the power of knowing your time is up in ‘7 Strange Questions That Help You Find Your Life Purpose’. He believes death is a great motivator for thinking about what’s important. And it’s not hard to agree.”

Everest
“We’re not all going to climb Everest or swim the English Channel but what’s wrong with making a few small changes along the way? A tweak here, an adjustment there, because small changes can still have a big impact on the quality of our lives.”

Time
“Mark Manson touches upon the power of knowing your time is up in ‘7 Strange Questions That Help You Find Your Life Purpose’. He believes death is a great motivator for thinking about what’s important. And it’s not hard to agree.

But what if, like Walt, we had a limited time left on this earth. Would we re-evaluate the things of importance to us? If we knew this was it, that our days were numbered, would we take back the control and fight for more?

We’d strive for more, push harder, look deeper. We wouldn’t accept the way things are so we’d adjust the edges, widen the boundaries and search for greater meaning and fulfilment, knowing that our time on this earth was limited.

I mean, when was the last time you turned in an essay four weeks early or finished that company report months ahead of schedule? Rather than leave it so late, it has to be better to get on with things before our time is up.

Rather than work 9-5, what about trying 8-4? Now you might spend only two hours in the traffic where before you spent more than three. You might get home in time to pick up the kids from school and have a better chance of taking them to the park one afternoon. The old adage ”work smarter, not harder” has never been truer. And, in these times, flexible working is key.”

Work
“Walt has an ordinary life. He works in a job below his pay scale and ability, has a social life that stinks, and spends most weekends at work or in the shopping mall. It’s a safe, steady life but one full of monotony and boredom.

We work our butts off and we hang out at the mall. We watch too much TV and we skip exercise in favor of the bag of chips or bowl of ice cream. We know we could do better but the day-to-day has a habit of getting in the way. We’ll change our routine tomorrow, research a new career next week and look for greater meaning in our lives once the kids have gone to bed.

We’d look at our lives — the lengthy commute to work, the long periods away from home, the corporate crap with its unrelenting hours, the way we define success — and we’d say “not interested,” “no, thank you,” and “no more.”

We already live in uncertain times — politically, economically and socially — so we cling on to any semblance of order and control in our lives. We work hard to provide for our families and find ourselves caught up in the daily 9-5 grind.

Rather than work 9-5, what about trying 8-4? Now you might spend only two hours in the traffic where before you spent more than three. You might get home in time to pick up the kids from school and have a better chance of taking them to the park one afternoon. The old adage ”work smarter, not harder” has never been truer. And, in these times, flexible working is key.”

Way
“Walt’s predicament got me thinking about death and the way we live our lives. Death comes to us all sooner or later but why do we always wait for bad news before we launch into action?

We work our butts off and we hang out at the mall. We watch too much TV and we skip exercise in favor of the bag of chips or bowl of ice cream. We know we could do better but the day-to-day has a habit of getting in the way. We’ll change our routine tomorrow, research a new career next week and look for greater meaning in our lives once the kids have gone to bed.

Or we’d add greater meaning to our lives in other, less extreme, ways. Perhaps we’d say “no” not as much, be kinder to ourselves and to others, embrace what we love in life, and focus on the people and things that matter most.

We’d look at our lives — the lengthy commute to work, the long periods away from home, the corporate crap with its unrelenting hours, the way we define success — and we’d say “not interested,” “no, thank you,” and “no more.”

We’re not all going to climb Everest or swim the English Channel but what’s wrong with making a few small changes along the way? A tweak here, an adjustment there, because small changes can still have a big impact on the quality of our lives.

To learn more about living a less ordinary way of life, visit In Search of a Life Less Ordinary. Become a subscriber here.”

Live
“Walt’s predicament got me thinking about death and the way we live our lives. Death comes to us all sooner or later but why do we always wait for bad news before we launch into action?

We work our butts off and we hang out at the mall. We watch too much TV and we skip exercise in favor of the bag of chips or bowl of ice cream. We know we could do better but the day-to-day has a habit of getting in the way. We’ll change our routine tomorrow, research a new career next week and look for greater meaning in our lives once the kids have gone to bed.

Or we’d add greater meaning to our lives in other, less extreme, ways. Perhaps we’d say “no” not as much, be kinder to ourselves and to others, embrace what we love in life, and focus on the people and things that matter most.

We already live in uncertain times — politically, economically and socially — so we cling on to any semblance of order and control in our lives. We work hard to provide for our families and find ourselves caught up in the daily 9-5 grind.

We’re not all going to climb Everest or swim the English Channel but what’s wrong with making a few small changes along the way? A tweak here, an adjustment there, because small changes can still have a big impact on the quality of our lives.

So we need to start living life on our terms and identify what’s important versus what doesn’t actually matter. Consider that our time on this planet is finite and start to live our lives with the kind of haste that normally follows bad news.”

Tv
“We work our butts off and we hang out at the mall. We watch too much TV and we skip exercise in favor of the bag of chips or bowl of ice cream. We know we could do better but the day-to-day has a habit of getting in the way. We’ll change our routine tomorrow, research a new career next week and look for greater meaning in our lives once the kids have gone to bed.”

Us
“Walt’s predicament got me thinking about death and the way we live our lives. Death comes to us all sooner or later but why do we always wait for bad news before we launch into action?

But what if, like Walt, we had a limited time left on this earth. Would we re-evaluate the things of importance to us? If we knew this was it, that our days were numbered, would we take back the control and fight for more?”

Ordinary
“Walt has an ordinary life. He works in a job below his pay scale and ability, has a social life that stinks, and spends most weekends at work or in the shopping mall. It’s a safe, steady life but one full of monotony and boredom.

To learn more about living a less ordinary way of life, visit In Search of a Life Less Ordinary. Become a subscriber here.”

Knew
“But what if, like Walt, we had a limited time left on this earth. Would we re-evaluate the things of importance to us? If we knew this was it, that our days were numbered, would we take back the control and fight for more?”

Going
“In my early 20s, I worked in a job going nowhere. By 28, I’d spent the best part of my early years in a town that didn’t inspire me. As I hit my thirties, I led an existence that left me wanting for so much more.

We’re not all going to climb Everest or swim the English Channel but what’s wrong with making a few small changes along the way? A tweak here, an adjustment there, because small changes can still have a big impact on the quality of our lives.”

Search
“We’d strive for more, push harder, look deeper. We wouldn’t accept the way things are so we’d adjust the edges, widen the boundaries and search for greater meaning and fulfilment, knowing that our time on this earth was limited.

To learn more about living a less ordinary way of life, visit In Search of a Life Less Ordinary. Become a subscriber here.”

Earth
“The other day, I started watching Breaking Bad. I realize I’m one of the last people on earth to see the ratings giant but I found one character fascinating.

But what if, like Walt, we had a limited time left on this earth. Would we re-evaluate the things of importance to us? If we knew this was it, that our days were numbered, would we take back the control and fight for more?

We’d strive for more, push harder, look deeper. We wouldn’t accept the way things are so we’d adjust the edges, widen the boundaries and search for greater meaning and fulfilment, knowing that our time on this earth was limited.”

Change
“When Walt finds out he’s dying, he jumps into action to change the course of his life and focus on what really needs to be done. Sure, he makes a bad decision there, but the point is that he re-evaluates his life and figures out what his priorities are once he gets the bad news.

We work our butts off and we hang out at the mall. We watch too much TV and we skip exercise in favor of the bag of chips or bowl of ice cream. We know we could do better but the day-to-day has a habit of getting in the way. We’ll change our routine tomorrow, research a new career next week and look for greater meaning in our lives once the kids have gone to bed.

I needed that important kick up the bum and the idea of change was terrifying, paralyzing. So much so that I chose the easy option and the path of less resistance. I stayed put.

We’re not all going to climb Everest or swim the English Channel but what’s wrong with making a few small changes along the way? A tweak here, an adjustment there, because small changes can still have a big impact on the quality of our lives.”

Focus
“When Walt finds out he’s dying, he jumps into action to change the course of his life and focus on what really needs to be done. Sure, he makes a bad decision there, but the point is that he re-evaluates his life and figures out what his priorities are once he gets the bad news.

Or we’d add greater meaning to our lives in other, less extreme, ways. Perhaps we’d say “no” not as much, be kinder to ourselves and to others, embrace what we love in life, and focus on the people and things that matter most.”

Thinking
“Walt’s predicament got me thinking about death and the way we live our lives. Death comes to us all sooner or later but why do we always wait for bad news before we launch into action?

Mark Manson touches upon the power of knowing your time is up in ‘7 Strange Questions That Help You Find Your Life Purpose’. He believes death is a great motivator for thinking about what’s important. And it’s not hard to agree.”

Wait
“Walt’s predicament got me thinking about death and the way we live our lives. Death comes to us all sooner or later but why do we always wait for bad news before we launch into action?”

Find
“When Walt finds out he’s dying, he jumps into action to change the course of his life and focus on what really needs to be done. Sure, he makes a bad decision there, but the point is that he re-evaluates his life and figures out what his priorities are once he gets the bad news.

Mark Manson touches upon the power of knowing your time is up in ‘7 Strange Questions That Help You Find Your Life Purpose’. He believes death is a great motivator for thinking about what’s important. And it’s not hard to agree.

We already live in uncertain times — politically, economically and socially — so we cling on to any semblance of order and control in our lives. We work hard to provide for our families and find ourselves caught up in the daily 9-5 grind.”

Kids
“We work our butts off and we hang out at the mall. We watch too much TV and we skip exercise in favor of the bag of chips or bowl of ice cream. We know we could do better but the day-to-day has a habit of getting in the way. We’ll change our routine tomorrow, research a new career next week and look for greater meaning in our lives once the kids have gone to bed.

Rather than work 9-5, what about trying 8-4? Now you might spend only two hours in the traffic where before you spent more than three. You might get home in time to pick up the kids from school and have a better chance of taking them to the park one afternoon. The old adage ”work smarter, not harder” has never been truer. And, in these times, flexible working is key.”

Control
“But what if, like Walt, we had a limited time left on this earth. Would we re-evaluate the things of importance to us? If we knew this was it, that our days were numbered, would we take back the control and fight for more?

We already live in uncertain times — politically, economically and socially — so we cling on to any semblance of order and control in our lives. We work hard to provide for our families and find ourselves caught up in the daily 9-5 grind.”

Home
“We’d look at our lives — the lengthy commute to work, the long periods away from home, the corporate crap with its unrelenting hours, the way we define success — and we’d say “not interested,” “no, thank you,” and “no more.”

Rather than work 9-5, what about trying 8-4? Now you might spend only two hours in the traffic where before you spent more than three. You might get home in time to pick up the kids from school and have a better chance of taking them to the park one afternoon. The old adage ”work smarter, not harder” has never been truer. And, in these times, flexible working is key.”

 

The People Around You Are Changing

 

“The grass is far from always greener on the other side of the street (at least most of the time), and while we shouldn’t compare ourselves to the people around us on a daily basis, it’s okay to take a look once a while.

The people you surround yourself with often reflect back on yourself. If you’re going through a phase where most of your friends have been going out all the time, and then they suddenly start to focus on work and family, it might be a sign.

This by no means imply you should change your life if you’re still feeling fulfilled and good about it. But if you turn your head and start noticing a change around you and it makes you rethink things, it’s probably a sign of you being ready to change as well.”

 

 

 

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